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My perspectives as an investor and consumer

Take a look under that TARP

barsness_bigbluemountainIntimidated and confused by all the programs initiated by the government within the past 12 months?  Don’t beat yourself up.  We are in the majority.  Let’s try and shed some light on these programs and gain some understanding into the allocation of our taxpayer dollars.

On October 3, 2008, the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (EESA) was signed into law amidst a tailspin in the financial markets.  The Troubled Assets Relief Program (TARP) was established under the EESA with the goal of stabilizing the financial system of the country and, hopefully, preventing a systemic collapse.  Under this law, the Treasury was granted authorization to spend up to $700 billion towards the purchase of troubled assets and the injection of capital into banking institutions.

The TARP has several programs under it:

  • Capital Assistance Program (CAP): to promote confidence in the financial system by ensuring that the nation’s largest banks have sufficient capital cushion against larger than expected future losses.  Financial institutions have to undergo a supervised stress test to be deemed eligible.  The stress test requires these institutions to make some assumptions. The banks would have to assume that the economy shrinks by 3.3 percent in 2009 and remains flat in 2010.  Assumptions will also have to include a decline in house prices by 22 percent this yearUnemployment should rise to 8.9 percent this year and reach 10.3 percent in 2010.  Big banks – those with consolidated assets greater than $100 billion – are required to carry out the test by the end of April.  If regulators assess that an institution does not have enough capital under these assumptions, they would have to raise the required capital either in the private markets or from the government.
  • Consumer and Business Lending Initiative (CBLI): a joint initiative with the Federal Reserve.  The goal of this program is to unfreeze consumer and business credit markets by providing financing to private investors willing to purchase assets backed by auto, student, small business, and credit card loans.  Under this plan the Federal Reserve will provide $200 billion in lending and the Treasury will support it with $20 billion in credit protection.
  • Making Home Affordable Program: an effort to stem the tide of foreclosures and declining home values through the employment of three initiatives:
    1. A refinance for 4 to 5 million people who took out loans owned or guaranteed by Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae
    2. A $75 billion loan modification program aimed at preventing foreclosures by targeting 3 to 4 million at-risk homeowners
    3. Support low mortgage rates by strengthening confidence in Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac through increased funding commitments to the two entities
  • Public-Private Investment Program (PPIP): to repair balance sheets throughout the financial system through the Legacy Loan Program and the Legacy Securities Program.  The loan program will facilitate the purchase of troubled loans from banks while the securities program will attempt to move the highly illiquid securities (such as mortgage-backed securities and collateralized debt obligations) off the balance sheets of banks and into the hands of investors.  The PPIP is conducted in conjunction with the FDIC and the Federal Reserve.  $75 to $100 billion in TARP capital is combined with private capital.  FDIC and the Federal Reserve will provide leverage for the private capital thereby increasing purchasing power to $500 billion-$1 trillion.  Remember how excessive leverage was our financial system’s undoing?  Looks like we’re going back to the same well in order to rescue the selfsame.  I may have to post another article just on the intricacies of the PPIP.
  • Capital Purchase Program (CPP): created in October 2008 to provide immediate capital to stabilize the financial and banking system, and to support the economy.  It is a voluntary program in which the US Government, through the Department of Treasury, invests in preferred equity securities issued by qualified financial institutions.  The goal is to invest up to $250 billion.  As of the April 10th report by the Treasury, $198.8 billion has been invested.
  • Asset Guarantee Program (AGP): under this program, Treasury will guarantee certain assets held by systemically significant financial institutions. Assets to be insured are selected by the Treasury and must have been originated before March 14, 2008.  In return for this assurance, the government collects a premium from the financial institution, the value of which is determined through actuarial analysis.  Citigroup seems to be the only institution so far to have qualified, and tapped into, this program or forced to do so.  It has received a guarantee on up to $5 billion of its assets to date.
  • Targeted Investment Program (TIP): the goal here is to stabilize the financial system by reducing the chance that one firm’s distress will threaten other financially sound businesses, institutions, and municipalities.  The program is implemented through investments in these unstable institutions.  Citigroup and Bank of America are the lucky ones chosen for this program, each receiving $20 billion through investments in preferred stock with warrants.
  • Automotive Industry Financing Program (AIFP): instituted to prevent a significant disruption of the American auto industry.  Most of the aid has been through the issue of loans, which have so far totaled $24.7 billion.  $5.5 billion has gone to Chrysler Holding and Chrysler Financial.  $19.2 billion has gone to General Motors and GMAC.  The notable exception is Ford Motor, which stayed away from government support and has taken this opportunity to separate itself from the other two.  New York Times has an article on how this company managed to stay independent.
  • Systemically Significant Failing Institution Program (SSFI): to prevent disruptions to financial markets from the failure of institutions that are critical to the functioning of the nation’s financial system.  This domain is reserved for those rarest of institutions – ones that made the worst business decisions of, at least, the past decade, and threaten to cut us all off at our knees.  The lone inhabitant of this realm is American International Group, Inc. or fondly referred to as AIG.  The taxpayers have used $40 billion from this program to prop up this company.  This is in addition to the ~$90 billion it has drawn from the credit-liquidity facility created for it by the Federal Reserve.

Now that you’ve taken a look under the TARP what impressions are you left with?

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Filed under: Economy, Government, , , , , ,

2 Responses

  1. […] the Treasury Department released details of the Public-Private Investment Program (PPIP), which is one of the programs under the TARP aimed at restoring financial […]

  2. […] of the programs created under the TARP is the Capital Assistance Program (CAP).  The CAP was designed to promote confidence in the […]

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